1st annual Criminal Justice & Rehabilitation Conference

Race, Culture, and Community: Fostering Collaborative and Innovative Partnerships
In this Section

UW-Stout and Menomonie Police Dept. logos

April 9, 2018

8:30 am - 4:45 pm

UW-Stout, Memorial Student Center

Registration Cost: FREE

The 1st annual Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation Conference is based on the community partnerships relationship philosophy. The inaugural theme, Race, Culture, and Community: Fostering Collaborative and Innovative Partnerships, focuses on what we, as a society, can do to help create safer communities, help others access the supports and services that promote health and well-being, and work to reduce racial and cultural disparities in our communities.

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation degree progam emerged as its own unique higher education program - a result of the demand for more training, education, and preparation of future criminal justice professionals. In partnering with the Menomonie Police Department to host the conference, UW-Stout's Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation program continues to actively demonstrate the focus to work with community agencies, as well as the community, to help foster innovative partnerships that bridge the gap between research and practice.

Please join us for this exciting inaugural event generously supported by the UW-Stout College of Education, Hospitality, Health and Human Science and the Department of Rehabilitation and Counseling. Check out the Event Information & Details page for further information about opportunities to connect and network with students and other attendees by applying for a Community Agency information table.

At-a-Glance Schedule

8:30 AM 4:00 PM

Registration & Check-in: Concourse Lounge

Community Agency Tables: Ballroom B

8:30 AM 9:00 AM Continental Breakfast and Networking
9:00 AM 9:10 AM Welcome and Introductions
9:10 AM 9:55 AM Keynote #1
9:55 AM 10:05 AM Break
10:05 AM 11:00 AM Session A & B
11:00 AM 11:10 AM Break
11:10 AM 12:05 PM Session C & D
12:05 PM 1:00 PM Lunch (on your own) & Networking
1:00 PM 1:55 PM Session E & F
1:55 PM 2:05 PM Break
2:05 PM 2:30 PM Session G & H
2:35 PM 3:00 PM Session G (continued) & I
3:00 PM 3:10 PM Break
3:10 PM 3:20 PM Student Awards
3:20 PM 4:05 PM Keynote #2
4:05 PM 4:15 PM Closing Remarks
4:30 PM   Conference Closed
Keith B. Wilson Image

KEYNOTE: The Impact of Race and Culture on Collaborative Partnerships

Dr. Keith B. Wilson, Professor, Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

 

Dr. Keith B. Wilson Keynote Description and Biography

Description: Dr. Keith B. Wilson will be discussing the impact that salient identities have on advocacy levels for people within the field of Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation as well as within the larger community. This keynote will explore factors that pose as barriers to fostering collaborative and innovative relationships between community members, community agencies, law enforcement agencies, students, faculty, and the larger university. Implications for relationship building and facilitating these relationships will be discussed.

 

Biography: Dr. Keith B. Wilson is Professor in the Rehabilitation Institute at Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC). He served as administrator and faculty member at The Pennsylvania State University for 15 years and Dean of the College of Education and Human Services at SIUC from July 1, 2012 until June 30, 2015. During his tenure at Penn State University, he was also the owner and Director of Counseling, Consultation and Psychotherapy, and Services (CCPS) in State College, PA. He received his B.A., M.Ed., and Ph.D. degrees from Wilberforce University (1984), Kent State University (1985), and The Ohio State University (1997), respectively.

Dr. Wilson’s research interests are primarily centered around two areas: (1) Cross-cultural/multicultural issues among persons with disabilities and (2) privilege based on phenotype (e.g., skin color, gender) in the United States. Committed to the ideals of research, teaching, and service, he has been honored with several service and research awards including the Researcher of the Year Award from the National Council of Rehabilitation Education (April 2012), the Virgie Winston-Smith Lifetime Achievement Award, presented by the National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns (2013) and the James F. Garrett Distinguished Career in Rehabilitation Research Award, presented by the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (2014). As a professor, he routinely teaches undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students.

Finally, Dr. Wilson has been active in Upward Bound, Summer Opportunity Research Program (SORP), and McNair programs contributing as a workshop presenter, social, and research mentor for the past 27 years. These programs are in place to facilitate college and/or graduate school success for students from underrepresented populations. He is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC), National Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Pennsylvania, and American Board of Disability Analysts (ABDA) Diplomat.

Eric Atkinson Image

KEYNOTE: Criminal Justice and the 21st Century

Eric M. Atkinson, Police Chief, Menomonie Police Department, Menomonie, Wisconsin

Eric M. Atkinson Keynote Description and Biography

Description: As the United States progresses through the 21st Century the criminal justice system cannot continue to focus all efforts on a crime control model to abate crime or minimize social disorder.  The criminal justice system needs to have a comprehensive approach to address complicated issues such as crime, mental illness, post-traumatic stress, homelessness, immigration, terrorism, poverty and civil disobedience.  

This presentation will discuss how current and future criminal justice practitioners will need to embrace and implement models centered around prevention, rehabilitation, and evidence-based practices in order to achieve long-term success.

Biography:

Eric M. Atkinson is a twenty-year veteran of law enforcement.  During his career he has served as a Crime Prevention Officer, Detective Sergeant, Patrol Sergeant, Lieutenant, Interim Chief of Police and Chief of Police.  Moreover, Eric serves as the Chairperson for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Community Policing Workshop Committee and as the Chairperson for the Dunn County Criminal Justice Collaboration Council.

In addition to his law enforcement experience he possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree in the Major of Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls and a Master of Arts Degree in Police Leadership & Administration from the University of St. Thomas located in St. Paul, MN.  Eric is also a graduate of the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar and Northwestern University’s ten-week School of Police Staff and Command. 

Eric also serves as an Adjunct Lecturer for the University of Wisconsin-Stout.  His previous academic teaching experience includes the University of Wisconsin-River Falls and the Chippewa Valley Technical College.  Furthermore, Eric has spoken nationally on topics including community policing and evidence based policing programs.

Eric is married with two children and currently reside in Menomonie, WI.  His hobbies include playing golf, coaching baseball and watching movies.

Concurrent Session Opportunities:

Session A: Three R's in Family Dysfunction/SPF-ing for...

Three R's in Family Dysfunction/SPF-ing for EBP

10:05 AM - 11:00 AM, Ballroom A

Nationally, statistics show that at least 25% of today's youth are living in a home with adults that have substance use disorders (SUDs). These children learn a different set of rules, roles, and relationship patterns that often pose problems in their lives. Many end up in the juvenile justice system. This presentation will help participants understand the dynamics in these homes, recognize children of alcoholics (COA's) and children of substance abusers (SOSA's) and the emotions that often drive the youths behaviors. Suggestions on how to respond when working COA's and SOSA's will be provided.

Presenter:

Kathy Asper, Manager of Prevention Services at Arbor Place, Inc. and Certified Prevention Specialist

Biography:

Kathy Asper, Manager of Prevention Services at Arbor Place, Inc. and Certified Prevention Specialist, has been providing prevention education to parents, students and community coalitions across the nation since 1986. Since 2001, she has served as a Training Associate for the US Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse/Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and a moderator for the SAMHSA on-line Ethics in Prevention Course. She also served a Program Reviewer for SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence based Programs and Practices (NREPP) from 2006 to 2015. From 2001-2008, Kathy worked as a regional coordinator for US Department of Justice funded Methamphetamine Prevention Project in South Dakota, providing education to parents/foster parents, school staff, MS and HS students, members of law enforcement, ER and EMS staff, social workers and more. She is also certified to deliver several evidence-based prevention programs including Guiding Good Choices (Parenting program), Prevention Research Institute's Prime for Life (court diversion program) and Mental Health First Aide.

Session B: Drug Court Works

Drug Court Works

10:05 AM - 11:00 AM, Ballroom C

There are currently 84 drug courts in the State of Wisconsin and more are in the process of development at this time. Each play a vital role in assisting individuals with substance use disorders to reclaim their lives.  Drug courts ensure community safety, are proven to reduce recidivism, and assist with individualized recovery.  Each of these areas leave a lasting impact on individuals and families throughout communities nationwide.  The National Association of Drug Court Professionals states that, “Drug Courts are the most effective justice intervention for treating drug-addicted people.”  Join us to learn about how we can provide treatment alternatives to incarceration and better the lives of those in our communities.

Presenters:

Jenae Brantner, Treatment Court Coordinator, Dunn County Treatment Court
Lindsey Field, MA, LPC, SAC, Integrated Treatment Specialist, Dunn County Treatment Court

Biographies:

Jenae Brantner is the Coordinator of the Dunn County Treatment Court and Treatment Alternatives and Diversion (TAD) programs.  She received her Bachelor’s degree in Vocational Rehabilitation with a concentration in Criminal Justice through UW-Stout.  She has been employed with Dunn County since 2013 and assisted with the restructure of its Treatment Court according to national standards and best practices. 

Lindsey Field, MA, LPC, SAC is the Integrated Treatment Specialist with the Dunn County Treatment Court and Treatment Alternatives and Diversion (TAD) Programs. She received her Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology from the Minnesota School of Professional Psychology in 2013.  She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and a licensed Substance Abuse Counselor (SAC) through the state of Wisconsin. 

Session C: Rehabilitation through Employment

Rehabilitation through Employment

11:10 AM - 12:05 PM, Ballroom A

Correctional agencies across the country have recognized the success of evidence-based practices and programming. Correctional industries like Minnesota’s MINNCOR Industries provide the fundamental base to establishing a stable work ethic while aiding in the professional development of each offender. In addition to Correctional Industries, MN DOC imitative TPC (Transition from Prison to Community) offers/fosters the opportunity to receive education, career-technical and cognitive-based programming to name a few. More than providing offenders stable employment, these programs teach valuable transferable skills that will allow them to be successful upon release. Transitional programing offer a fresh start. 

This presentation will discuss the success and power of providing offenders jobs through correctional industries and supportive transitional programs. Through their combined experience working with MINNCOR, the presenters will demonstrate how offenders, staff and communities all benefit while working together.

Presenters:

Julia Kraemer, EMPLOY Program Job Search Trainer, MINNCOR Industries 
Mike Hreha, Employer and Business Development, MINNCOR Industries

Biographies:

Julia Kraemer-Martens is a Workforce Development Specialist for MINNCOR’s EMPLOY Program and is one of the job search trainers. She facilitates groups in MCF-SHK (main/CIP), MCF-FRB (main/min), MCF-RW (min) and MCF-WR (CIP). Prior to working for EMPLOY, Julia was employed with the DOC as a Probation/Parole officer for Le Sueur and Nicollet County and prior to that a Ramsey County Juvenile Probation Officer. Julia holds a Bachelor’s degree in Vocational Rehabilitation with a concentration in Criminal Justice and Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. 

Michael Hreha has worked for the past nine years as an Employer Development Specialist and the past four years in business development for MINNCOR Industries. In this role he is responsible for exposing businesses to the benefits of hiring ex-offenders participating in the EMPLOY Program and partnering with MINNCOR for sub-contract services. Michael’s unique individualized approach has helped many participants make contact with potential employers, ultimately leading to their employment. Mike holds a Bachelor’s degree in General Business Administration from University of Wisconsin-Stout.

Session D: CVTC Law Enforcement Academy

CVTC Law Enforcement Academy

11:10 AM - 12:05 PM, Ballroom C

This presentation will include information related to the role of the Wisconsin Law Enforcement Standards Board (LESB), the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Bureau of Training and Standards, and the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) as they apply to the training and education of law enforcement and jail officers. The application and selection process for the academy will be discussed as well as the structure and curriculum of the academy. Graduate certification standards and requirements will be addressed as well as the selection and certification standards for academy instructors.

Presenter:

Eric Anderson, Director, CVTC Law Enforcement Academy

Biography:

TBA

Session E: Understanding How Trauma Affects the Brain and...

Understanding How Trauma Affects the Brain and Emotional Regulation 

1:00 PM - 1:55 PM, Ballroom A

Traumatic stressors, such as early trauma, can lead to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Rates of PTSD and exposure to violence among individuals intersecting with the criminal justice system are higher than the general population. The symptoms of PTSD and environmental triggers can destabilize and present barriers in one’s attempts to maintain stability during incarceration and probation. Professionals can assist in promoting growth and wellness by understanding how trauma shapes the brain, learning, and behavior that for many, results in a life- long process of managing symptoms.

Presenter:

DeLeana Strohl, Ph.D., CRC, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Biography:

DeLeana Strohl is an Associate Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation and Counseling at University of Wisconsin-Stout. Her professional experience includes DVR rehabilitation counselor, mental health therapist and director of clinical services for a group psychology practice.  Her areas of specialization include: psychosocial adjustment to disability, aging and disability, psychiatric rehabilitation, trauma, multicultural counseling, and rehabilitation counselor education.

Session F: Canine Prison Program – Can Do Canines

Canine Prison Program – Can Do Canines

1:00 PM - 1:55 PM, Ballroom C

Summary: Individuals with disabilities may need assistance in completing various tasks in order to live, obtain, and maintain independence in the community. Human beings are not always reliable and it can be costly to pay someone to assist you when you are limited on income. Learn about the collaboration of the Stanley Correctional Institution, Can Do Canines, and community volunteers filling that need through the training of service dogs. Hear about the life changing results for handlers at the institution, persons with disabilities receiving the dogs, and volunteers in the community.

Presenters:

Dyan Larson, Can Do Canines, Stanley Correctional Institution & Jackson Correctional Institution
Lori Patrouille, Warden's Secretary, Stanley Correctional Institution
Lizzie Tegels, Warden, Jackson Correctional Institution
Laurie Carlson, Community Outreach Coordinator, Can Do Canines
Colleen Etzbach, Program Director, Rehabilitation Services Program, UW-Stout

Biographies:

Dyan Larson is a successful competitor, teacher, trainer, dog groomer and business owner, Dyan has made a living with dogs for the past 25 years.  She was hired in 2016 by Can Do Canines to run the dog program at Stanley Correctional Institution, and a year later, launch the program at Jackson Correctional Institution.  Dyan loves working with the inmates and having the chance to contribute to society in so many ways.  

Lori  Patrouille is the Warden's Secretary at Stanley Correctional Institution (SCI) in Stanley, WI. She started her career with the Department of Corrections in 2001, working in various positions within the Department, having served over eight years as the Warden's Secretary. Lori was instrumental in the implementation of the Can Do Canines service dog training program at SCI in 2016 and continues to assist in management of the PAWS program (Prisoners Assisting With Service dogs), working closely with the inmates, staff and Can Do Canines. 

Lizzie Tegels has been with the Department of Corrections for over 29 years serving in a variety of roles to include Officer, Sergeant, Probation and Parole Agent, Captain, Unit Supervisor and Deputy Warden.   Lizzie was appointed Warden in 2011 and currently serves in that capacity at Jackson Correctional Institution, a medium security institution housing nearly 1000 male inmates.  Lizzie was an instrumental part of the collaboration to bring Can Do Canines program to the institution.  She has seen first-hand the positive impact the program has made on the inmate handlers and the overall institution climate.  

Laurie Carlson is the Community Outreach Coordinator at Can Do Canines. She has been with Can Do Canines for 18 years. During that time she was the Volunteer Coordinator until the position split into multiple positions last fall. Currently, she handles all requests for presentations to the general public, employer groups and service clubs. She maintains and grows their group of speakers, and promotes Can Do Canines with community members in key areas. Ms. Carlson also supports the Volunteer Coordinator in recruitment efforts.

Colleen Etzbach is the Program Director of the Rehabilitation Services Program at UW Stout. She is a volunteer with Can Do Canines fostering puppies in the Great Start Program which go on to the PAWS (Prisoners Assisting With Service dogs) Program and weekend fostering with the dogs that are currently in the PAWS program. 

Session G: Social Justice for People with Disabilities

Social Justice for Individuals with Disabilities: Considerations for Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation Professionals

2:05 PM - 3:00 PM, Ballroom A

Due to lack of understanding, stigma, prejudice, and fear, individuals with disabilities experience social injustices that have significant implications in criminal justice and rehabilitation settings. Individuals with disabilities are many times more likely to be the victims of crimes and abuse, yet are disproportionality incarcerated when compared to the general population. Criminal justice and rehabilitation professionals must be aware of the social injustices that individuals with disabilities experience and the role that society has in maintaining them; otherwise, professionals risk perpetuating both the victimization, and socially unjust treatment of individuals with disabilities. This presentation will explore the concepts of disability and social justice, and their sociopolitical impacts on criminal justice and rehabilitation. Considerations related to the equal protection and socially just treatment of individuals with disabilities will be discussed.

Presenter:

Daniel Kelsey, PhD, CRC, University of Wisconsin–Stout

Biography:

Daniel Kelsey, Ph.D., CRC, is an associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation and Counseling at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. He serves as the director of the M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling program and teaches graduate and undergraduate rehabilitation courses. Dr. Kelsey is the project director for a Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) Long-Term Training Grant that provides scholarships to graduate level rehabilitation students. His research interests are focused in the areas of sociopolitical construction of disability, social justice for individuals with disabilities, and evidence-based practices. Dr. Kelsey received a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Brigham Young University, and both a Masters of Rehabilitation Counseling (MRC) and a Ph.D. from Utah State University.  He is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) and has worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor and as a mental health case manager.

Session H: Evidenced Based Policing Strategies

Evidenced Based Policing Strategies

2:05 PM - 2:30 PM, Ballroom C

Given today’s climate of mistrust in government, including law enforcement, it is more important than ever to provide our communities service buttressed in integrity.  Evidence based policing strategies utilize current academic research to enhance programs aimed at improving outcomes, reducing incarceration, enhancing public safety and building trust. Adhering to traditional models of policing such as zero-tolerance practices erode trust and saturate our prisons with people that would benefit from incarceration alternatives.

This presentation will give citizens, academics and criminal justice practitioners examples of functional programs that are simple to implement, study and provide greater outcomes for all parties involved.  Additionally, the audience will be given the opportunity to understand barriers in the community and strategies on overcoming such obstacles.

Presenter:

Eric M. Atkinson, Police Chief, City of Menomonie Police Department; Adjunct Lecturer, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Biography:

Eric M. Atkinson is a twenty-year veteran of law enforcement.  During his career he has served as a Crime Prevention Officer, Detective Sergeant, Patrol Sergeant, Lieutenant, Interim Chief of Police and Chief of Police.  Moreover, Eric serves as the Chairperson for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Community Policing Workshop Committee and as the Chairperson for the Dunn County Criminal Justice Collaboration Council.

In addition to his law enforcement experience he possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree in the Major of Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls and a Master of Arts Degree in Police Leadership & Administration from the University of St. Thomas located in St. Paul, MN.  Eric is also a graduate of the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar and Northwestern University’s ten-week School of Police Staff and Command. 

Eric also serves as an Adjunct Lecturer for the University of Wisconsin-Stout.  His previous academic teaching experience includes the University of Wisconsin-River Falls and the Chippewa Valley Technical College.  Furthermore, Eric has spoken nationally on topics including community policing and evidence based policing programs.

Eric is married with two children and currently reside in Menomonie, WI.  His hobbies include playing golf, coaching baseball and watching movies.

Session I: A Local Perspective on Evidenced-Based...

From Theory to Practice: A Local Perspective on Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) and the Intersection of Health and Criminal Justice

2:35 PM - 3:00 PM, Ballroom C

Dunn County, Wisconsin, is taking a leading role and participating in national initiatives like Evidence-Based Decision Making and the Stepping Up Iniative to reform our local and state criminal justice systems. This workshop will highlight the efforts undertaken by one local community to collaborate across systems and agencies to reduce harm, reduce recidivism, and improve outcomes for justice involved individuals and our community as a whole.  Attendees will learn about the cutting edge programs and approaches that are occurring right here in our local community.

Presenters:

Kris Korpela, Human Services Director, Dunn County, WI
Sara Benedict, Criminal Justice Coordinator, Dunn County, WI

Biographies:

Kristin Korpela is the Director of the Dunn County Department of Human Services located in west central Wisconsin.  A social worker by trade, she has been the DHS Director for four years having previously been the Deputy Director and a Family & Children's Services Manager.  Over the past 30 years, Kristin has had experience in working with children and families, children with disabilities, behavioral health and most recently has chaired the Stepping Up Initiative for the Dunn County Criminal Justice Collaborating Council.

Sara Benedict serves as the Criminal Justice Coordinator in Dunn County, Wisconsin. She leads a 17-member cross-disciplinary Criminal Justice Collaborating Council (CJCC) focused on collaboration to improve the effectiveness of Dunn County’s criminal justice system. Coordinator Benedict, a proud Air Force veteran and UW-Stout alumni, is a licensed professional counselor and certified rehabilitation counselor who oversees the county’s criminal justice rehabilitation programs. Recent CJCC collaborative efforts have focused on the Stepping Up Initiative, Data Driven Justice, Treatment and Diversion (TAD), Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) and Jail to Community Reentry.