COVID-19 Surge Testing

The University of Wisconsin-Stout is offering free rapid-result COVID-19 antigen tests to off-campus students, UW-Stout employees, and community members.
In this Section

Testing for community members only at this site beginning February 1.

The University of Wisconsin-Stout is offering free rapid-result COVID-19 antigen tests to off-campus students, UW-Stout employees, and community members. The tests are being offered through a partnership between the UW System and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help address the current surge in COVID-19 virus in Wisconsin.

The Abbot BinaxNOW antigen tests will provide a result in 15 minutes. The antigen tests are self-administered using a light nasal swab under the supervision of medical professionals. In certain situations, a free follow up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test will be required to confirm the original result.

Who can get tested?

Any community member aged 5 years or older who is symptomatic or asymptomatic. (UW-Stout faculty, staffon-campus and off-campus students should follow their separate protocols.)

Pre-Registration is Required 

Test participants will be able to retrieve results by logging into the Do I Need a COVID-19 Test portal after receiving an email that results are ready.

Pre-register for your free test

Tests will be administered in the West Gym on the lower level (south end) of the Sports and Fitness Center. Masks are required. Community members should plan to enter the facility through the south doors near the softball field, please follow the signs for the appropriate entrance.

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays | 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tuesdays and Thursdays |8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Sports & Fitness Center - West Gym
3rd St. E (corner of 3rd St. East and 13th Ave. West)

Parking

Parking for COVID Surge Testing will be available on the closed dead-end section of 3rd Street along the east side of the Sports and Rec Complex. Look for parking signage directing vehicles to designated testing spaces on 3rd Street.

Download a printable UW-Stout Campus Map, the Sports & Fitness Center is building #5 on the map.
 

Thumbnail image of testing site map

Map of Community Surge Testing Site

Click on the image to view a full size, printable map of the Community Surge Testing site in West Gym, room 54.

Understanding your rapid antigen test results

To best understand what your rapid antigen test results mean, you must first determine if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. These include: 

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body ache
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

What your test results mean:

No Symptoms, Rapid Antigen Test Result is Negative:

You most likely do not have COVID-19 at this time. This test did not detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, when your specimen was collected.

However, you still may be an asymptomatic carrier or acquire the virus later. If you are a close contact of someone with COVID, you need to complete your 14-day quarantine. If you are not in quarantine, continue social distancing, wearing a mask, and washing your hands frequently.

Symptoms, Rapid Antigen Test Result is Negative:

You may still be infected with SARS-CoV-2. Get a confirmatory test today. PCR testing will be available on-site after your rapid antigen test. Results may take up to four days.

While waiting for these results, isolate at home, monitor symptoms and stay in touch with your doctor. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

No Symptoms, Rapid Antigen Test Result is Positive:

Get a confirmatory test today. PCR testing will be available on-site after your rapid antigen test. Results may take up to four days.

While waiting for these results, isolate at home, monitor symptoms, and stay in touch with your doctor. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school, or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

Symptoms, Rapid Antigen Test Result is Positive:

You are infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. You should isolate at home except to get medical care if your symptoms worsen.

Stay in touch with your doctor and monitor your symptoms. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately. Isolation means that you do not go to work, school, or public areas; remain in a separate room in your home and use a separate bathroom if possible; don’t share personal items; and follow all standard safety protocols.

Rapid Antigen Test Result is Indeterminate:

There was an error with your test, and we need to repeat it.  Please get back in line so that we can retest you. 

After you are diagnosed with COVID-19

You can be diagnosed with COVID-19 in the following ways:

  • A doctor tells you that you have it based on your symptoms and exposures. OR
  • You have a positive lab test that detected the virus in your nose.
(NOTE: A positive antibody blood test means you likely had COVID-19 in the past.)

Even if you don’t have symptoms, you will need to separate yourself from other people in your home, also called “isolation,” and self-monitor until you are no longer able to spread COVID-19 to others.

If you've been told to isolate:

If you’ve been instructed to separate yourself from other people in your home, also called “isolation,” you will need to know when it is safe to stop your isolation.

  • If you are waiting for a second (confirmatory) test result: You must isolate until you receive your second test result, which may take 3-4 days.
  • If you have been diagnosed with COVID-19: After being diagnosed with COVID-19, even if you don’t have symptoms, you will need to isolate and self-monitor until you are no longer able to spread COVID-19 to others.

Common questions regarding isolation:

When is my home isolation over?

Home isolation is over when:

  1. You have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without using a medicine that reduces fevers.
  2. Your other symptoms have improved for at least 24 hours.
  3. At least 10 days have passed since you first had symptoms.
What if I never had symptoms?

You should still stay isolated for at least 10 days after you were tested.

How long am I contagious to others?

You can spread COVID-19 to others beginning two days before your symptoms start until a few days after you recover. Even if you never develop any symptoms, you may be able to spread COVID-19 to others.

How can you notify close contacts of their exposure?

Notifying your own close contacts of their exposure to COVID-19 can help limit the spread in your community. Any close contact, except those who had COVID-19 within the previous 3 months and have no symptoms, should stay home and watch for symptoms for 14 days after they last had close contact with you.

Who should I notify?

First, you need to determine the time period during which you could have exposed others. If you have symptoms, you were able to spread COVID-19 starting two days before your first symptoms started.

If you have not had any symptoms, you were able to spread COVID-19 starting two days before your positive COVID-19 test was taken.

You should notify anyone with whom you had close contact while able to spread COVID-19.

How do you define close contact?

Close contact is defined as any of the following interactions:

  • Having direct physical contact with someone. (e.g. hug, kiss, handshake)
  • Being within 6 feet of someone for 15 minutes total in a day.
  • Having contact with your respiratory secretions. (e.g. coughed/sneezed on, contact with dirty tissue, sharing a drinking glass, food, towels or other personal items)
  • Living with or spending the night with someone.
What do I tell my close contacts?

CDC and Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) recommend that close contacts quarantine in their home for 14 days, beginning the last day they were exposed to you. This should be done regardless of whether your contact receives a negative test during their quarantine period because they could develop symptoms 2 to 14 days after being exposed.

Your contact may receive a call from Public Health who will ask your contact some questions and provide additional information. Please ask your contact to answer the phone call.

The DHS fact sheet called “Next steps: close contacts of someone with COVID-19” will provide more details for what to do to protect others.

If your contact has additional questions, they can contact their primary care provider, local health agency or visit the Wisconsin DHS COVID-19 Website dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/diagnosed.htm.

What if I want to remain anonymous?

There is an online tool called “Tell Your Contacts” which allows for anonymous text or email notifications.

To send notifications from this tool:

  1. Visit tellyourcontacts.org.
  2. Select email or text notification.
  3. Enter your contacts’ information and exposure date.
  4. Select either the pre-written message or customize your own. You do not need to enter your name.
  5. Send your message.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is surge testing?

What is surge testing?

Surge testing efforts will immediately increase testing support for communities throughout Wisconsin now facing dramatic increases of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations related to the ongoing outbreak.

What will it entail?

United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is partnering with the UW System and its 13 universities to provide free antigen testing to anyone 5 years and older to the community at-large. There will be 250,000 tests available.

What kind of tests?

These are Abbott BinaxNOW antigen tests that provide a result in about 15 minutes. The federal government purchased Abbott BinaxNOW diagnostic tests on August 27 to ensure equitable distribution of the first 150 million units – one day after an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) was issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The UW System universities will be the first testing sites using the BinaxNOW.

Will there be PCR tests?

PCR Tests distributed by the federal government and allocated by the state Department of Health Services will be used as a confirmatory test in line with Department of Health Services existing protocol.

Why is the UW System doing this?

UW System and its universities are leveraging an opportunity to enhance testing in their communities in an effort to halt the spread of COVID-19. This is the embodiment of the Wisconsin idea in which our university system uses its capacity, resources, and expertise to solve problems and help people.

Why did HHS choose Wisconsin?

HHS responds to state and local communities dealing with outbreaks. Surge testing is intended to help local, state, and federal public health experts identify new cases, including asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. Identifying asymptomatic “silent spreaders” is critical to combatting the outbreak in Wisconsin.

When will campus sites be up and running?

As soon as possible. In some cases, as early as this week, thanks to the cooperative efforts of the federal, state and local governments.

Will there be a cost to those getting a test?

No.

Do you have to be experiencing symptoms, be a close contact, or be a community resident to get a test?

No.

How are they administered?

They are self-administered using a light nasal swab under the supervision of medical professionals.

What is the role of the UW System and universities?

UW System worked with the federal government to secure the tests and offered the assistance of the universities, which are setting up testing sites in an extraordinary effort.

How will people know about the sites?

Universities will be working with local public health to publicize the testing sites.

Can they just show up or do they need to register?

Register for the free test at www.doineedacovid19test.com. Participants must also use the site to obtain results. The locations for testing will become available as they are up and running.

 

Questions?

If you have any questions, be sure to follow up with your health care provider. You may also contact Wisconsin Health Connect at wihealthconnect.com and receive a call back from a nurse within 24 hours.