African American Links

Affirmative Action
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/affirm/links.htm
The Washington Post's affirmative action coverage page. This site features news stories and other information on affirmative action, including congressional commentary, presidential remarks and policies, coverage of the Sharon Taxman v. Piscataway Board of Education case, and articles on California's Proposition 209.

Affirmative Action Resource Center
http://www.nationalcenter.org/AA.html
The National Center for Public Policy Research's page of affirmative action research materials and information. The four sections of the page provide commentary, legislation, litigation, and links on affirmative action in the United States. The commentary is largely from news sources and political or policy groups and touches on a variety of issues and perspectives in the debate over affirmative action policies.

African-American Mosaic: Abolition
http://lcweb.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam005.html
A visual introduction to the early American abolitionist movement. Maintained by the Library of Congress and based on their own collection of images and documents, the site contains images of antislavery pamphlets, advertisements, and sheet music with explanatory text.

African-Americans on Reconstruction
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aap/aaphome.html
A searchable collection of 300 pamphlets pertinent to African American life after the Civil War. Maintained by the Library of Congress, the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection can be searched by keyword or browsed by subject and author index. Among the authors represented are Frederick Douglas, Alexander Crummel, and Emanuel Love.

Africans in America
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part1/narrative.html
A powerful narrative of the African American experience during the Slave Trade. PBS's site offers images, text, maps, and timelines to illustrate the evolution of the slave trade during the period from 1450-1750 ("The Terrible Transformation", Part I of a PBS series, Africans in America). Additional materials on the periods from 1750-1865 are also available on the site. These documents poignantly recall the period of the establishment of the slave trade and its impact on Africa and the American colonies in terms of individual experiences and accounts.

Africans in America: Judgment Day
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/title.html
A site on the deepening conflicts in American life as slavery expanded into the West and increasingly entrenched itself into political institutions. One section of a four-part site created by PBS Online as a supplement to a television documentary, Judgment Day covers the years 1831 to 1865. It contains a brief narrative of the period and an extensive resource bank, which includes short explanations of key people and events, historical documents, and commentary by historians.

Africans in America: Revolution
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/title.html
A site on the personal, religious, and legal challenges of African Americans during the Revolutionary Era. One section of a four-part site created by PBS Online as a supplement to their television documentary, Revolution covers the years 1750-1805. It contains a brief narrative of the period and an extensive resource bank that includes short explanations of key people and events, historical documents, and commentary on specific subjects by historians.

Africans in America: The Terrible Transformation
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part1/title.html
A site on the Atlantic slave trade and the history of Africans in America during the three centuries following European contact with Africa. One section of a four-part site created by PBS Online as a supplement to their television documentary, The Terrible Transformation covers the years 1450-1750. It contains a brief narrative of the period and an extensive resource bank that includes short explanations of key people and events, historical documents, and commentary on specific subjects by historians.

Amistad, 1839–42
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118607/
A guide to the Amistad Revolt of 1839 to 1842, a shipboard revolt off the coast of Cuba that led to an intense legal battle in the United States about slavery and the slave trade. Presented by Mystic Seaport, the site includes a timeline, other secondary sources, and a library of more than 500 primary-source documents.

Baseball, the Color Line, and Jackie Robinson
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/jrhtml/jrhome.html
An examination of the history of the Negro leagues and the impact of Jackie Robinson on American sports and society. Part of the American Memory exhibit at the Library of Congress, the site is divided into chronological segments. It features manuscripts, photographs, books, maps, and transcripts of speeches and broadcasts, and includes a section on Robinson's efforts in the Civil Rights movement. The site also links the user to a collection of baseball photographs from the 1860s to the 1920s.

First-Person Narratives of the American South
http://docsouth.unc.edu/fpn/
A collection of narratives on the South by southerners. Part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's "Documenting the American South" collection, the reminiscences span from the antebellum period to 1920. With the full texts online along with thumbnail images of the book's illustrations, covers, and spines, the sources consist of autobiographies, memoirs, and diaries by a variety of southerners from former slaves to Confederate soldiers to women at home.

Freedman and Southern Society Project
http://www.inform.umd.edu/ARHU/Depts/History/Freedman/home.html
Homepage for the University of Maryland project Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867. The project is working on publishing a nine volume series of documents from the history of African American Emancipation. Excerpted documents from four of these volumes are available online. These documents tell the individual stories of masters, slaves, soldiers, and civilians whose lives were changed with the coming of emancipation. The project has also assembled a timeline to help students place the documents in their historical context.

Lower Mississippi Delta Region
http://www.cr.nps.gov/delta/concept06.htm
This site offers a brief history of the Lower Mississippi Delta. Maintained by the National Park Service, the site spans from prehistory to the Civil War, giving special attention to the elaborate earthen architecture of early culture along the "Nile of the New World."

Martin Luther King, Jr.
http://www.seattletimes.com/mlk/index.html
A documentary and biographical treatment of Martin Luther King, Jr. Created by the Seattle Times, the site contains commentary by MLK contemporaries, a civil rights timeline, a photography exhibit, an examination of King's legacy, and a study guide with links to related topics. Some audio features are also included.

The Affirmative Action and Diversity Project
http://aad.english.ucsb.edu/aa.html
Collection of resources from the University of California, Santa Barbara, on affirmative action policies and diversity in the United States. Affirmative action has been a hotly debated policy since the official introduction of the idea in President Johnson's 1965 "Executive Order 11246." This site explores the history of affirmative action legislation and race relationships in America through important government documents, essays, and links to other Web site resources.

The Survey Graphic, Harlem Number, March 1925
http://etext.virginia.edu/harlem/index.html
An online reproduction of the March 1925 "Harlem Number" of the Survey Graphic magazine, which gave national exposure to the Harlem Renaissance and featured work by W.E.B. Du Bois, Countee Cullen, Angelina Grimké, and others. Produced by the University of Virginia Electronic Text Center, the site also includes a brief introduction to the text and an array of contemporary reviews.

Third Person, First Person: Slave Voices
http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/slavery/
A library of manuscripts and broadsides that shed light on the social life of slavery. Created by the Special Collections Library at Duke University, the exhibit includes thumbnail images of broadsides calling for the return of runaway slaves and records from southern plantations.

Uncle Tom's Cabin and American Culture
http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/utc/
A site dedicated to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin. Presented by the Special Collections Library at University of Virginia, the exhibit includes the full text of Stowe's novel, as well as a series of responses and reviews.