Military Etiquette

Select a topic below for more information:

Escorting Tips

  • Make a good first impression.
  • Be at the right place, at the right time, in the right uniform.
  • During the duty day, wear the uniform of the day; all other times, wear W/G or DG.
  • Make eye contact and introduce yourself to the visitor. “Sir, my name is Cadet John Doe.”
  • Offer a firm handshake to male visitors; wait for women visitors to offer their hand first.
  • Master the fine art of conversation!
  • Think before you speak.
  • Visitors are interested in you, cadet life and UW-Stout. Be positive.
  • Steer away from controversial topics (politics, religion, sex).
  • Don’t be a whiner.
  • Use common sense and be polite.

Military Dining

The Military Dining-In Guide [doc] was designed to assist the United States Military Academy Cadets and the newly commissioned lieutenants in the successful planning and execution of a military dining-in. This booklet was put together with the help of various sources and is intended to serve as a guide, deviations are expected. You will find that most military units and many cadet companies have developed their own very specific and unique traditions conduct of their dining-in.

Receiving Lines

Receiving line order:

  1. Mother, then Father

  2. Grandmother, then Grandfather

  3. Aunt, then Uncle

  4. Sister, then brother

  5. Girlfriend/boyfriend

  6. Yourself
    Rule of thumb: Ladies First!

Take off your gloves.

Step next to the line aide or “greeter.” You should be side-by-side with him/her. Do not shake his/her hand. Tell his/her the names of each of your guests as they walk past both of you in the order listed above. Your guests will not shake the line aide’s hand.

He/she will announce their names to the official host/hostess of the receiving line.

Follow your last guest through the line.

Each guest shakes hands with the official party members in the line and repeats their name to all members, except the official host, while offering a greeting. “Good evening, sir/ma’am, my name is Mary Smith.”

Remember, this is not the time for a long conversation!

Receiving Lines afford guests the opportunity to greet their host and hostess of the evening.

Duties of the aide or “greeter”

  • Arrive early to meet your receiving line participants.
  • Position yourself at the head of the line, standing “at ease”.
  • Do not shake hands w/ guests.
  • Clearly announce the names of all guests to your line host/hostess.

Invitations

Graduation Invitations

  • Send four weeks prior to graduation to those you are inviting to the grad exercises.
  • Insert your cadet photo or a personal note with the invitation so the recipient knows it’s from you!
  • Place in inner envelope; label this envelope with “spoken names” (Uncle Bob and Aunt Kim; Grandma and Grandpa; Captain and Mrs. Jones).
  • Place the inner envelope inside the larger outer envelope.
  • Address with full titles, names and addresses (Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith; Captain and Mrs. William Jones).
  • Attach postage and mail!

Graduation Announcements

  • Sent just after graduation to announce you’ve graduated.
  • Enclose a photo, personal note, or one of your Lieutenant “business” cards – so the recipient knows who it’s from.
  • Place in inner envelope; label this envelope with “spoken names” (Uncle Bob and Aunt Kim; Grandma and Grandpa; Captain and Mrs. Jones).
  • Place inner envelope inside larger outer envelope. Address with full titles, names and addresses (Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith; Captain and Mrs. William Jones).
  • Attach postage and mail!

Addressing Invitations

The inside envelope faces the back of the outside envelope so the names will be face up when the envelope is opened. All envelopes are addressed by hand.

Outside Envelope

Inside Envelope

Sergeant First Class and Mrs. Anthony R. Jones

Sergeant and Mrs. Jones

Major and Mrs. Smith

Major and Mrs. Gregory Smith

Major and Mrs. Robert L. Burns

Major and Mrs. Burns

Major Mary Williams and Mr. Paul Williams

Major Williams and Mr. Williams

Captain John Tyler and Captain Erin Tyler (or) Captains John and Erin Tyler


The Captains Tyler

Brigadier General and Mrs. Patrick O’Leary

General and Mrs. O’Leary

Major Katherine Brown and Sergeant Major Peter Brown, United States Army, Retired

Major Brown and Sergeant Major Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. White

Grandpa and Grandma

Dr. Daniel Smith and Dr. JoAnne Smith and Family

Uncle Dan, Aunt JoAnne, Cindy Lou, Junior, and Kyle

Other Stationery

Some of you may have purchased folded note cards with your name or your class crest. Use these for thank you notes or simply as stationery as you begin your new career in the Army.

Military and Civilian Dress Codes

Men:

Casual Civilian: Khakis or slacks, polo or shirt with collar
Casual Cadet: Cadet casual uniform IAW USCC SOP
Casual Military: ASU B’s
Business Casual Civilian: Slacks, collared shirt (blazer and tie optional)
Business Casual Cadet: As for class
Business Casual Military: ASU B’s
Informal Civilian: Khakis or slacks, collared shirt and tie, sport coat or blazer
Informal Cadet: Dress Gray, White over Gray (summer)
Informal Military: ASU A’s
Semi-Formal Civilian: Dark business suit, white or light shirt, tie
Semi-Formal Cadet: Dress Gray
Semi-Formal Military: ASU A’s
Formal Civilian: Dark suit or tuxedo
Formal Cadet: Full Dress, India White
Formal Military: ASU A’s, Dress Mess, Army White

Women:

Casual Civilian: Slacks or skirt with polo or buttoned shirt
Casual Cadet: Cadet casual uniform IAW USCC SOP
Casual Military: ASU B’s
Business Casual Civilian: Dress, slacks and jacket, or skirt with blouse/sweater
Business Casual Cadet: As for class
Business Casual Military: ASU B’s
Informal Civilian: Business dress, skirted suit, pants suit
Informal Cadet: Dress Gray, White over Gray (summer)
Informal Military: ASU A’s
Semi-Formal Civilian: Cocktail dress, knee-length skirt and dressy top
Semi-Formal Cadet: Dress Gray
Semi-Formal Military: ASU A’s
Formal Civilian: Long dress or formal pants suit
Formal Cadet: Full Dress, India White, Cadet Dress Mess
Formal Military: ASU A’s, Dress Mess, Army White

The Army Service Uniform is currently in transition. For up to date military attire, refer to Army 670-1. Cadets refer to USCC 670-1.

National Anthem and Parade Etiquette

When the band plays the National Anthem, all civilian and military personnel not in uniform should stand and face the American Flag.Ladies render respect by placing the right hand over the heart. Gentlemen do likewise, except when wearing a hat, remove the hat and hold it at the left shoulder with the right hand over the heart.  

When the American Flag passes during the parade, respect is rendered in the same manner as for the National Anthem. Military stand and salute in the instances outlined above.