Conference Schedule

This conference event has been cancelled. If you would like to be notified if/when this program is rescheduled, please email Tiffani Taggart at taggartt@uwstout.edu or ProfEd@uwstout.edu.


Conference Schedule

Conference participants will have the opportunity to select three trainings described below for the morning sessions and three trainings for the afternoon sessions. All sessions except the Panel/Roundtable sessions will be repeated three times. As registration for each section is limited, session selections will be made during the registration process. Any requests for changes after submitting the registration form should be sent to ProfEd@uwstout.edu. Conference sessions will be held at three Gateway Technical College campus sites in the Racine/Kenosha area. All sites are within 10-15 minutes of each other.

Thursday, October 18, 2012
Location: iMET Center (formerly CATI)
2320 Renaissance Blvd, Sturtevant WI 53177

5:30-6:00 pm Registration and Check-In
6:00-7:00 pm Conference Opening and Welcome Session
Bryan Albrecht, President, Gateway Technical College
Brian Mcalister, Executive Director, University of Wisconsin-Stout School of Education
Kristina Ropella, Professor and Biomedical Engineering Chair, Marquette University
Bob Strangeway, Interim Program Director, Electrical Engineering Technology, Milwaukee School of Engineering
Judy Prest, Transfer Admissions Counselor, Milwaukee School of Engineering

7:00-8:30 pm Opening Reception, Networking and Tours of the iMET facilities

Friday, October 19, 2012
Morning Location: Horizon Transportation Center
4944 88th Avenue, Kenosha, WI 53144

8:00-8:40 am    Continental Breakfast and Networking
9:00-9:55 am    Morning Breakout - Session #1
10:05-11:00 am    Morning Breakout - Session #2
11:10 am-12:05 pm    Morning Breakout - Session #3
12:05-12:25 pm    Travel time to Kenosha Campus

Afternoon Location: Kenosha Campus T & I Wing
3520 30th Avenue Kenosha, WI 53144

12:25-1:05 pm    Boxed Lunches and Networking
1:05-2:00 pm    Afternoon Breakout - Session #4
2:10-3:05 pm    Afternoon Breakout - Session #5
3:15-4:05 pm    Afternoon Breakout - Session #6
4:05-5:00 pm    Networking and Vendor Booths



Morning Breakout Session Options:

Automotive Minds-On: Electronic Diagnostics
Matt Janisin, Gateway Technical College

The level of complexity of today's vehicles presents challenges to today's high school teachers. Gone are the days of the shade tree mechanic, but there are clearly ideas all students should understand about automotive systems as they are a part of our everyday life. As vehicles have become more complex so have the tools used to diagnose them. This session is intended to give specific information on how to use today's diagnostic tools in a way that both stimulates and challenges your students to understand modern vehicle troubleshooting. Naturally, a physical overview of the tools and an explanation of the various ports, connectors, buttons and controls will be included. More importantly, however, in this session you will:
  • Be able to use specific contemporary diagnostic tools to build your own technical competence.
  • Understand the role diagnostics play in modern industry.
  • Understand how to apply this content and technology in your specific classroom and lab setting.
  • Be advised of resources you need to inform your own content knowledge.
  • Be given strategies to improve the productivity of your students when they are faced with a complex diagnostic situation.

Why Do ALL students need to know about Diesel Technologies?
Rod Gordon, Gateway Technical College
Joe Paleck, Gateway Technical College

Don't diesel engines just run trains and big trucks? That's the perception of most students, right? As teachers of technology, you are concerned that your students understand how this technology is being used to do work in many industries. Specifically, in this session you will be given access to the Advanced Propulsion Training Facility here at Gateway, a 12,800-square-foot addition to the Horizon Center, and be asked to explore one of the systems common to diesel technology. You will leave this session being able to:
  • Understand the role diesel technology plays in biofuels and other sustainable engine technologies – those currently used – and others as they are developing.
  • Use educational models and discover their role in conveying specific technological ideas.
  • Understand how to apply this content and related technology in your specific classroom and lab setting.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform your own content knowledge.

How Industry Moves: Fluid Power
Mike Renzoni, Gateway Technical College

Typically dump trucks and robots come to mind when the idea and related technology associated with fluid power is mentioned. In reality, these examples are not common in the lives of most young people today. Indeed, hydraulic and pneumatic systems are utilized in industries as diverse as fast food to industrial maintenance to the production of artificial limbs. However, all fluid power devices share basic components (reservoir or tank, pump or compressor, valve, and a cylinder) that make not only the technology they use accessible in a classroom, but also add context to math and physical science concepts. After this session, you will be empowered to:
  • Understand and appreciate the ways in which fluid power applies to industry, as well as, everyday living.
  • Understand how the basic physical laws involving energy, fluid mechanics, and related materials are embedded in classroom approaches to the study of fluid power.
  • Become involved in meaningful activities and problems that are designed to be solved through the fundamentals of fluid power laboratory "best practice" instruction.
  • Understand how to apply this content and related technology in your specific classroom and lab setting.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform your own content knowledge.

Where did all the tools go? Tool Control and Inventory
Wes Wojciechowski, Gateway Technical College

As a teacher, control and accountability of tools, equipment, and electronic diagnostic devices is critical as it has impacts on our budget, instructional opportunities for subsequent classes, and safety of our labs. Specifically, the elimination of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) is paramount considering the impact it can have on equipment. Indeed, FOD related accidents cost the U.S. Air Force millions of dollars each year! The purpose of this session is to provide an introduction to a highly effective, but very affordable tool control system used in industry and its potential in your classroom. Obviously, due to the diverse nature of labs and classrooms in secondary education, one size does not fit all when it comes to tool control policy. Some units may have only a few small items, while others have literally hundreds of pieces of equipment. This session will offer an opportunity to observe and use an established program, as well as offer specific techniques that will help you in your effort to maintain a safer and more effective educational environment for your students. Specifically, this session offers you the opportunity to:
  • Understand and be able to articulate to students the importance of tool control procedures as they pertain to specific instances in industry, but also how they contribute to an effective learning environment.
  • Understand how to apply this content and related technology in your specific classroom and lab setting.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform your own content knowledge.

Afternoon Breakout Session Options:

Solar Energy: An Industry Approach that Works in YOUR Classroom
James Jazdzewski, Gateway Technical College

Sustainable Energy Systems, part of Gateway's Electrical Engineering Technology program, provides students with training in the design and maintenance of sustainable energy equipment and projects in the area of solar energy. However, the labs, budgets, and educational outcomes are different for secondary programs…

Therefore, in this session, you will have an opportunity to see and actually do what professionals in this career track do to design, install, and oversee solar/photovoltaic energy projects in homes as well as businesses. In addition, details will be offered of how key ideas can be delivered with your student demographic in mind. Specifically, this session offers you the opportunity to:
  • Define basic terminology associated with solar energy systems.
  • Describe the purpose and principles of operation for major photovoltaic system components.
  • Understand how photovoltaic modules are configured in series and parallel to build voltage, current and power output.
  • Understand the safety requirements for operating and maintaining different types of photovoltaic systems and related equipment.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform your own content knowledge.
  • Understand how to apply this content and related technology in your specific classroom and lab setting.

Project Lead The Way Applied: Industry Examples, Applications, and Instructional Enrichments & Alternatives
Greg Quam, Director School Engagement, PLTW
Pat Hoppe, Gateway Technical College
John Nelson, Gateway Technical College

Project Lead The Way (PLTW) has been adopted by a number of school districts as a way to approach science, technology, engineering, and math concepts. Often teachers of various disciplines attend a two week "boot camp" during the summer months in order to be trained in ways to deliver pieces of the curriculum. However, as with any new material, for some only a fragile understanding of key concepts is built during this time. During this session, Gateway instructors (who are also PLTW instructors) will utilize lab resources and facilities to give an industry perspective to salient concepts PLTW instructors are asked to cover. Specifically, after this session, you will be empowered to:
  • Recognize affordable products and resources found in nearly all communities that can be built by the instructor on a modest budget to illustrate important technological and scientific ideas.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform and deepen your own content knowledge.
  • Understand how to apply PLTW content to specific industry related technologies, systems, and careers.

HVAC systems? Why are we studying this?
Larry Hobbs, Gateway Technical College

Simply put, a HVAC technician installs, maintains, and repairs heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. However, examined through the lens of an educator, HVAC systems are a grounded yet sophisticated series of contexts to deliver lessons about control, mechanisms, electricity/electronics, structures, and mechatronics. Because of its potential to offer immediate face value to a broad spectrum of students, studying these topics by utilizing HVAC systems as a medium can be very powerful. Indeed, HVAC technicians are representative of all contemporary technicians in that they must be able to understand the operating principals of different systems and are required to expand their skills and keep up with current technology by taking additional industry sponsored courses. Specifically, this session offers you the opportunity to:
  • Identify systems common to most technologies that are embodied in the study of HVAC systems.
  • Recognize approaches to the study of HVAC systems that are important and appeal to students that have no inclination to enter the field.
  • Recognize affordable products and resources found in nearly all communities that can be built by the instructor on a modest budget to illustrate important technological and scientific ideas.
  • Readily locate specific resources you need to inform and deepen your own content knowledge.
  • Understand how to apply HVAC system content to specific industry related technologies, systems, and careers.

Panel/Round Table - Secondary CTE Programs and Approaches
Brad Haag - Racine Unified School District
Mark Hinterberg - Kenosha Unified School District
Chris Pratt - Kenosha Unified School District
William Hittman - LakeView Technical Academy

The goals of Career and Technical Education programs are much different from other general education courses such as Technology Education as they aspire to train students for a specific vocational skill set needed in industry – and this requires a different approach to teaching and learning. As a result, successful CTE programs are the result of very careful curricular, financial, and industry partnership planning.  In this session, you will have an opportunity to hear from and have a conversation with successful CTE teachers about the programs they have built and maintained along with strategies they have used to remain relevant relative to common core standards. Specifically, in this session you will:
  • Be advised of curricular resources you need to inform your own CTE specific content knowledge.
  • Be advised of how other teachers locate and leverage funding resources you need to maintain your own CTE program and achieve teaching and learning goals.
  • Be advised of how to locate sustainable, relevant, significant industry partnerships that are necessary to maintain CTE program objectives.
  • Understand the key differences between general education and vocational education (CTE) and the effect this has on teaching and learning goals.
  • Understand approaches CTE instructors have taken to incorporate common core standards in curriculum design and instructional strategies.

Panel/Round Table - School Administration's Role in CTE Program Success
Brad Haag - Racine Unified School District
Mark Hinterberg - Kenosha Unified School District
Chris Pratt - Kenosha Unified School District
William Hittman - LakeView Technical Academy

Effective Career and Technical Education programs require teachers with clear goals for their students and diligent attention for contemporary trends in industry. Effective school administrators create a learning environment where teachers truly teach and students truly learn. A healthy relationship is formed between CTE teachers and school administrators when there is a clear and agreed upon vision of curriculum that follows the values and morals of the educational community that governs their school. During this session, you will have access to CTE teachers and school administrators in order to hear about and ask questions regarding the synergy needed between these two entities to produce an effective and vital CTE program. Specifically, in this session you will:
  • Understand how money, personnel beliefs, community beliefs, materials, preparation time and implementation time are negotiated between CTE teachers and their administrators.
  • Understand the factors that influence administrator's obligation to ensure the curriculum matches the student needs, skill levels, values, attitudes and desired habits.
  • Understand approaches administrators have taken with CTE instructors to incorporate common core standards in curriculum design and instructional strategies.
  • Be advised of "best practices" curricular, funding, and industry resources you need to inform your own CTE program as you work with your administration to satisfy the needs of your specific educational community.

Panel/Round Table - CTE Program Articulation Agreements
David Stricker, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Jane Finkenbine, Director, College Connection at Gateway Technical College

For the first time in US History, total student loan debt exceeds the nation's credit card debt.  The rising cost of a college education leaves many students on the sidelines.  Articulation agreements between high schools and technical colleges are one way to address this issue.  Articulation (also called dual credit) provides free college credit to high school juniors and seniors.  CTE teachers can help their students and promote embroilment in their own courses by partnering with the technical colleges to teach advanced standing or transcripted credit courses.  Specifically, in this session, you will:
  • Learn the differences between the different types of articulation agreements
  • Understand the advantages of both advanced standing and transcripted credit agreements
  • Learn the process to initiate an articulation agreement with a technical college and the responsibilities of both the secondary CTE teacher, and the college faculty


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Contact Information

Tiffani Taggart
Outreach Program Manager

Professional Education Programs and Services
221 10th Avenue E
Menomonie, WI 54751

Email: taggartt@uwstout.edu
Phone: 715.232.2793
Fax: 715.232.3385