Sexual Assault Information for Men

Sexual Assault Information for Men

UW-Stout encourages victims of sexual assault to report the crime to the University Police or the Menomonie Police Department as soon as possible and to preserve any evidence which may be necessary in a criminal case. Any employee of UW-Stout who receives a report from an enrolled student that the student had been sexually assaulted shall encourage the victim to contact University Police. The employee shall also report the incident to the Dean of Students. The Dean shall compile reports for the purpose of disseminating statistical information.
Things to Think About

  • Think about whether you really want to have sex with someone who doesn't want to have sex with you; how will you feel afterwards if your partner tells you s/he didn't want to have sex.
  • Every person has the right to say "no" to any sexual act. Do not assume that previous permission for sexual contact means she wants to have sex again.
  • When you use threats, intimidation, or force against your partner to have sex, you are committing a crime.
  • If you are getting a double message from a woman, speak up and clarify what she wants. If you find yourself in a situation with a woman who is unsure about having sex or is saying "no," back off. Suggest talking about it.
  • Be sensitive to women who are unsure whether they want to have sex. If you put pressure on them, you might be forcing them.
  • Do not assume you both want the same degree of intimacy. She might be interested in some sexual contact other than intercourse. There may be several kinds of sexual activity you might mutually agree to share.
  • Stay in touch with your sexual desires. Ask yourself if you are really hearing what she wants. Do not let your desires control your actions.
  • Communicate your sexual desires honestly and as early as possible. Accept the woman's limits; listen to her and assume she means what she says.
  • Do not assume her desire for affection is the same as a desire for sex.
  • A woman who turns you down for sex is not necessarily rejecting you as a person; she is expressing her decision not to participate in a single act at that time.
  • No one asks to be raped. No matter how a woman behaves, she does not deserve to have her body used in ways she does not want.
  • The fact that you were intoxicated is not legal defense to rape. You are responsible for your actions, whether you are drunk or sober.
  • Be aware that a man's size and physical presence can be intimidating to a woman. Many victims report that the fear they felt based on the man's size and presence was the reason why they did not fight back or struggle.
  • On the UW-Stout campus, victims of sexual assault will be encouraged to file a police report.
  • In any campus disciplinary proceeding involving sexual assault the accuser and accused shall be entitled to the same opportunity to have others present and both shall be informed of any outcome which may include the full-range of sanctions up to and including dismissal.
  • Listen to your partner. Assume that "no" means "no." If you are right, you have not offended your partner. If she did not mean no, she can ask for further sexual activity.
  • Interrupt woman-hating jokes, sexual harassment and any other form of sexual violence. Spread the message that violence against women is not okay.
  • Use peer pressure to help stop abusive behaviors which may lead to acquaintance rape. For example, cut down on the use of drugs and alcohol at parties. Interrupt conversations that focus on sexual exploitation of women. Condemn the behavior of peers who brag about their sexual "conquests."