Community Policing

Introduction

UW-Stout Police department began as a security based department in the mid 1970's and evolved into a protective law enforcement agency in 1981. Today the UW-Stout Police Department consists of a Chief, Two Sergeants, Six Full-time Officers, Six Part-time officers and a Court Officer.

The primary functions of the department are:

  • Preservation of the public peace and order
  • The prevention and detection of crime and the apprehension of offenders
  • The protection of persons and property
  • The enforcement of the laws of the State of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents Chapter 18 Statutes

Together, working with the administration, staff, and student population, UW-Stout Police are united in partnership to serve and protect the University's unique and diverse community through education, technology, community relations and the application of State and Federal law. We embrace the challenge and opportunity to grow and become a part of the UW-Stout family utilizing the Community Policing Concept. Under the community policing philosophy, the emphasis is on cooperation between law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve. Community policing focuses on proactive approaches to law enforcement rather than reactive responses to crimes already committed. The two primary components of community policing are community partnerships and problem solving. To that end, the concept of community policing:

  • Promotes community, government and police partnerships
  • Promotes proactive problem solving
  • Promotes community involvement in addressing the causes of crime, fear of crime and other community issues.

In order to be successful, community policing requires the total commitment of the police and the community, including individual citizens as well as businesses and government. Community policing is proactive, personalized and "full service", with the goal of removing criminals from the streets and solving long-term problems by dealing with their causes rather than just reacting to their symptoms.

Click to view a video about our C.O.P.S program (TV News Video)