Faculty & Staff Profiles

KirkJ

John Kirk

Chemistry

Office: 334C Jarvis Hall - Science Wing
Phone: 715/232-2209
Email: kirkj@uwstout.edu

Education

  • Postdoctoral Associate, Chemical Education, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, August 2006 - May 2008

  • Postdoctoral Associate, Bioanalytical Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, October 2005 - July 2006
  • Ph.D., Analytical Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, June 2000 - October 2005

  • B.A., Chemistry with Honors, Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA, August 1996 - May 2000

Research Interests

  • We are trying to harness the unique properties of nanomaterials to create robust sensors for compounds found in complex mixtures, for example glucose in whole blood. Silica colloid are small particles that are less than a few hundred nanometers in size. These particles can be deposited to form a well-organized colloidal crystal that has pore size of about the size of molecules. This is essentially a simple filter that excludes molecules and particles that are larger than the pore size. We are building our sensors out of these silica colloidal crystals and incorporating a second type of colloid: gold. Gold colloid has several unique properties as a result of it's nanoscale. This includes a beautiful intense red color that can change ever so slightly when molecules are close to the surface. In our mixed colloidal crystals, the silica colloid acts as a simple filter, while gold colloid acts as a sensing surface. Students work on this project are gaining an invaluable research experience grounded in interdisciplinary research, learning how to combine ideas from different areas of not just chemistry, but other sciences including materials science and surface science.

    Kirk Colloid Research Information

  • As a Primarily Undergraduate Institution teaching an increasing number of students in cutting-edge interdisciplinary fields (e.g. biotechnology, nanoscience, others), we are often times hard-pressed for funding of the high-cost instrumentation and techniques that our students will use in their chosen profession. There is a critical need for training our future scientists and engineers in these areas to remain competitive in the evolving world economy.

    UW-Stout is in a unique position to explore an innovative solution to this problem that is faced by the majority of higher education institutions. In addition to engaging students in these high-tech areas of study, we have recently started a major in Game Design and Development that has attracted about 120 students in just two years. The major thrust of our proposed work would involve pairing groups of students in Game Design and Development courses with groups of students in courses of Nanoscience (and in similar interdisciplinary programs). These students would then develop games and/or simulations that incorporate advanced STEM topics on a level not normally addressed in their undergraduate studies.

    The positive aspects of this project range from broadening student learning through the game development process; to the production of an educational gaming product for higher education or the general public; to incorporating industrial partners interested in increasing exposure to their methods and products.

    NanoFever Opening Screen

Courses Taught

  • CHEM-115, General Chemistry
  • CHEM-125, Chemistry for Health Sciences
  • CHEM-135, College Chemistry I
  • CHEM-331, Quantitative Analysis
  • CHEM-335, Instrumental Methods of Analysis
  • NANO-301, Nanostructures
  • NANO-330, Characterization Methods of Nanomaterials
  • APSC-101, Applied Science Profession I

Appointments

  • Associate Professor, Chemistry and Nanoscience, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI, August 2012 - present
  • Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Nanoscience, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI, August 2008 - August 2012

  • Visiting Assistant Professor/Postdoctoral Associate, Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, August 2006 - May 2008
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Chemistry, Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA, January 2007 - May 2007

  • Postdoctoral Associate, Bioanalytical Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, October 2005 - July 2006
Research Group Pictures
Kirk Group Picture, October 2012
October 2012: Noah Holzman, Dr. Kirk, Shane Cahill, and Austin Schwartz
Kirk Group Picture, October 2010
October 2010: Dr. Kirk, Austin Schwartz, Bradley Bondhus, Jack Stransky