WORKSHOPS 

 SPRING 2015

  • February 9, 2015, 2:30 - 3:30 (Student Center, Northwoods)
    Life + 10
    Presenter: Leni Marshall (English and Philosophy
    )

    What would you do to extend your lifespan by ten percent, an addition of seven healthy years?  For years, we have known there are health benefits for individuals of color who have lower levels of unconscious racism; the same is true for women and sexism.  Now, we have learned this applies to aging and ageism as well...and we are all aging.  Leni Marshall will discuss this groundbreaking research and its ethical implications.
    REGISTER


  • March 3, 2:30 - 3:30 (217 Library)
    CEHHS goes to SEAC: Faculty share their Ethics Research
    Presenter: Bob Salt (HDFS)


    The society for Ethics across the Curriculum hosts a conference each year in which faculty share their latest research and pedagogical innovations.  In this session Bob Salt will share his research presented at the 2014 SEAC conference.  Bob will discuss ethics, morality, ad value in the context of an undergraduate human sexuality course.
    REGISTER


  • April 2, 11:30 - 12:30 (Student Center, Badger)
    Social Responsibility and Ethical Reasoning: Teaching Diversity
    Presenters: Glenda Jones (English and Philosophy) & Tina Lee (Social Sciences)


    Many ethical and social responsibility issues arise in the context of diversity.  What is diversity?  Why should students learn about it?  What obstacles arise when teaching it?  Glenda Jones and Tina Lee will present and lead a discussion of such issues and how their courses address them.
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  • April 22, 3 - 4 (Student Center, Northwoods)
    Pedagogy that Promotes Academic Integrity


    This session will explore some of the options James Lang suggests instructors use in his recent book Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty (Harvard, 2013).  Lang draws upon considerable empirical research into student cheating to explore proactive pedagogical changes instructors can makes to encourage academic honesty and reduce academic dishonesty.  Everyone is invited to discuss Lang's ideas and examples and bring their own ideas and examples to the table.
    REGISTER


  FALL 2014

  • October 9, 2014, 1:00 - 2:00 (Student Center, Northwoods)
    Teaching Ethics Online
    Presenters: Monica Berrier (English & Philosophy) & David Seim (Social Science)

    Is teaching ethics online different from teaching ethics in a traditional classroom?  Are there advantages or disadvantages to online ethics instruction?  Are you struggling with an ethics component in an online class?  Whether you are a veteran online instructor, a "newbie" to online instructions or contemplating teaching online - come discuss the pros and cons and ins and outs of teaching ethics online.

    *REGISTER HERE

  • October 13, 2014, 9:00 - 10:00 (Student Center, Oakwood)
    TurnItIn - Originality Checker and Dropbox
    Presenters: Rich Berg (Learning Technology Services) & Elizabeth Buchanan (The Center for Applied Ethics)

    When grading Dropbox assignments in Learn@UW-Stout, it would be convenient to be able to add comments to student submissions without having to download and upload the document or send it through email.  Using the TurnItIn originality checker enables instructors to comment on student papers within the Dropbox area, which the students can view.  Session topics will include ethical use of the originality checker, how to set up the Dropbox to use TurnItIn, using the Grade Mark feature, and how students can view the comments made by the instructor.  Instructors are encouraged to ask questions during and after the presentation.

    *REGISTER by contacting Millie Kotulek

  • October 27, 2014, 10:10 - 11:10 (Student Center, Oakwood)
    TurnItIn - Originality Checker and Dropbox
    Presenters: Rich Berg (Learning Technology Services) & Elizabeth Buchanan (The Center for Applied Ethics)

    When grading Dropbox assignments in Learn@UW-Stout, it would be convenient to be able to add comments to student submissions without having to download and upload the document or send it through email.  Using the TurnItIn originality checker enables instructors to comment on student papers within the Dropbox area, which the students can view.  Session topics will include ethical use of the originality checker, how to set up the Dropbox to use TurnItIn, using the Grade Mark feature, and how students can view the comments made by the instructor.  Instructors are encouraged to ask questions during and after the presentation.

    *REGISTER by contacting Millie Kotulek

  • November 3, 2014, 11:25 - 12:20 (Student Center, Cedar/Maple)
    Teaching Social Responsibility and Ethical Reasoning
    Presenters: Byron Anderson (Apparel and Communication Technologies) & Jeff Sweat (Social Science)

    This workshop will explore issues related to General Education Category F: Social Responsibility and Ethical Reasoning courses.  What should their objectives be?  What topics should they cover?  What skills do they develop?  What are your best practices in teaching them?  Is the new category working well?  Come share your point of view in an open discussion of these and further questions.

    *REGISTER HERE

  • November 7, 2014, 10:10 - 11:10 (Student Center, Northwoods)
    TurnItIn - Originality Checker and Dropbox
    Presenters: Rich Berg (Learning Technology Services) & Elizabeth Buchanan (The Center for Applied Ethics)

    When grading Dropbox assignments in Learn@UW-Stout, it would be convenient to be able to add comments to student submissions without having to download and upload the document or send it through email.  Using the TurnItIn originality checker enables instructors to comment on student papers within the Dropbox area, which the students can view.  Session topics will include ethical use of the originality checker, how to set up the Dropbox to use TurnItIn, using the Grade Mark feature, and how students can view the comments made by the instructor.  Instructors are encouraged to ask questions during and after the presentation.

    *REGISTER by contacting Millie Kotulek

  • November 19, 2014, 2:30 - 3:30 (Student Center, Northwoods)
    Race, Class, and Gender: How can we effectively teach about inequality?
    Presenters: Virginia Lea (School of Education) & Tom Pearson (Social Science)

    In response to both internal and external pressures, there is a widespread movement in higher education to infuse more ethics and social responsibility instruction into the curriculum, but can university effectively do this?  What evidence, if any, supports it?  Are some pedagogies more effective than others, and if so, why?  What can an instructor hope to achieve in a single class?  What can a program or university hope to achieve over 4 - 5 years? Come share your perspective in a lively conversation.

    *REGISTER HERE