Freshman Objectives

Outcomes for UW-Stout's First-Year Composition Sequence (ENGL 090, 101, and 102)




Overview of Goals and Outcomes for UW-Stout's First-Year Composition Sequence
Introduction: The general purpose for most first-year college writing courses is to help students become more skilled, confident, and critical writers, readers, and thinkers – attributes which will help them succeed and grow as students, professionals, and citizens.  As such, the following four umbrella goals/outcomes are designed to guide and achieve this purpose for the entire composition sequence in UW-Stout's First-Year Composition Program.  The idea is that students in each writing course will be working towards fulfilling these outcomes, but to different degrees and levels of sophistication.  These outcomes/goals are derived from the first-year composition outcomes designed by the Council of Writing Program Administrators: http://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.html; because of their flexibility and potential to add coherence and consistency to college composition sequences, the WPA Outcomes have been adapted by over 100 colleges and universities in the U.S.  The adaptation of the outcomes to the specific courses in the sequence is spelled out in the individual course narratives and descriptions below. 

 
Achieving the Outcomes: A Flexible Pedagogical Approach:  While there is a minimum amount of formal academic writing required in each of the courses in the sequence (see requirements below) and each course must feature a good deal of direct writing instruction, in helping students achieve the outcomes, instructors can utilize a variety or combination of approaches and themes: e.g. cultural studies, literary, historical, classical rhetorical, and others.  Further, in helping students meet the learning outcomes for the course, instructors are free to choose their own texts and develop their own unique writing assignments and class activities.


Umbrella Goals and Outcomes for First-Year Composition Sequence
Rhetorical Knowledge: Students will understand how audience, purpose, context, and language shape the meaning and function of any text and will apply this understanding in a variety of specific writing situations.


Critical Thinking/Reading: Students will use reading and writing as a means of inquiry—that is, as a way to generate ideas and questions, to understand the social and cultural implications of complex texts and debates, and to consider and express the relationship of their own ideas to the ideas of others.  Students should understand the connections among language, knowledge, and power.


Processes: Students will practice a writing process that is flexible, recursive, and responsive to the needs of specific writing situations.  They will develop strategies for each phase of the process, such as: pre-writing/invention, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. They will understand this process as social and collaborative, assimilating feedback and critiquing the work of others.  Students will also develop a process for conducting academic research, which involves critically utilizing an array of print and electronic sources.


Conventions: Students will gain extensive practice in various genres of writing. They will utilize the appropriate tone, documentation style, grammar, syntax, punctuation, and spelling demanded by specific writing situations


Narratives and Outcomes Statements for Courses in UW-Stout's First-Year English Sequence


English 090, Writing Workshop
Overview/Purpose: English 090 is the developmental, non-credit writing course in the first-year writing sequence that is required of students who receive an EPT score below 360. Through immersion in the writing process, which will include both informal assignments and formal essays, students will gain confidence and develop independent writing/thinking skills.  Students will learn active reading strategies and will practice and review academic writing conventions, such as: grammar/mechanics, sentence structure, organization, and paragraph development.  Additionally, students will be introduced to basic source integration and documentation practices and will develop a working vocabulary for discussing writing. Students completing English 090 with a grade of "C" or higher will have the skills and confidence to succeed in English 101, Composition 1.  Students in English 090 will be asked to write a minimum of between 2000-2500 words in formal essays.


Outcomes:
At the conclusion of English 090, students should demonstrate the ability to:

  • Understand that every text has a particular rhetorical context: audience, purpose, genre
  • Communicate ideas in an organized, coherent manner for outside readers
  • Actively read and respond to texts, including their own written drafts, and those of their peers
  • Distinguish between and make connections between their own ideas and the ideas of others
  • Understand that writing is a process, one which is often time-consuming and complex
  • Adapt the writing process to the needs of individual writing tasks
  • Produce writing that demonstrates basic proficiency in standard edited English so that meaning is not obscured by mechanical or grammatical error
  • Begin adapting conventions such as format, structure, and tone to a given rhetorical situation
  • Exercise basic skills in incorporating the ideas of others accurately and fairly through summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation

English 101, Composition 1


Overview/Purpose: English 101 is the introductory course in the first-year writing sequence for students who receive a score of 360-530 on the EPT.  Students will practice college-level reading and writing and develop effective writing strategies and processes.  Additionally, they will learn to respond to and write in a variety of genres and rhetorical situations and will be introduced to academic research, source-supported writing, and argumentation. Through course readings and writing assignments, students will engage in critical inquiry and reflection.  English 101 begins a learning process that students will continue in English 102 and future classes across the college curriculum.  Students in English 101 will be asked to write a minimum of between 3000-3500 words in formal essays. Students must receive a "C-" or better in English 101 to move on to English 102.


Outcomes:
At the conclusion of English 101, students should demonstrate the ability to:

  • Analyze and respond to the needs of different audiences and rhetorical contexts
  • Make rhetorical choices consistent with a controlling purpose
  • Read texts actively and analytically, identifying the purpose(s) and audience(s) for which a given text has been constructed
  • Recognize basic elements of persuasive and argumentative writing (appeals, claims, reasons, evidence, etc.)
  • Make informed connections and distinctions among others' ideas as well as between one's own ideas and those of others
  • Understand knowledge and information as existing within a broader situational and cultural context
  • Understand and practice writing as a recursive and strategic process, utilizing prewriting/invention, drafting, revising, and editing
  • Understand the collaborative nature of writing, and demonstrate the ability to critique one's own work and the work of peers
  • Learn the basics of academic research:
  • Become familiar with academic databases and library search engines
  • Learn how to assess the credibility of research sites and material
  • Discover the importance of scope in selecting topics and pertinent research
  • Understand what it means to join an academic "conversation" on a topic
  • Use conventions of structure, style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to the rhetorical situation
  • Practice accurate, ethical, and appropriate usage of primary and secondary sources
English 102, Composition 2

Overview/Purpose: English 102 advances through academic research and inquiry the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills acquired in English 101. Students will continue to develop rhetorical strategies of reading and writing to enter into a larger academic discourse. Students will work with a variety of readings and texts, including imaginative literature, and will understand how such texts work together and talk to each other.  All readings in English 102 support inquiry-based writing, enabling students to study subjects or themes in depth so that they can write in depth and with authority. The level of writing and research is significantly more sophisticated than in English 101, and students will acquire and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to fulfill the composition sequence.  Students in English 102 will be asked to write a minimum of between 3000-3500 words in formal essays. 

Outcomes:
At the conclusion of English 102, students should demonstrate the ability to:

  • Showcase a sophisticated knowledge of the rhetorical situation, social/cultural/historical context, language, and consequences of a variety of texts
  • Apply rhetorical knowledge to a variety of academic writing projects
  • Respond thoughtfully and critically to a variety of texts
  • Refine skills of summary, analysis, and synthesis
  • Make effective use of the conventions of argument (appeals, claims, reasons, evidence, etc.)
  • Utilize the research process effectively:
  • Identify subjects of inquiry and appropriate research topics/questions
  • Utilize academic research tools and databases
  • Identify key debates presented in the research for a selected topic
  • Formulate thesis statements
  • Select appropriate sources relevant to a research subject
  • Sustain controlled idea/argument throughout a lengthy academic paper
  • Effectively integrate and document sources according to the assigned documentation style
  • Edit work for clarity, style, appropriate syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling

English 111 Honors English



Revised (09/00)


1.Objectives: Honors English focuses on the classics of world literature. English 111 studies works from ancient times through the seventeenth century. The course assumes a high reading level of the students and proven ability to compose college-level essays based on literature. As a result of studying world literature, students in Honors English should demonstrate their ability to:

  • Comprehend the literal level of literary texts.
  • Interpret literary texts from various cultures and time periods; for example, students should be able to draw, support, and develop inferences based on literary texts.
  • Appreciate the variety of world literature and understand how literature is related to history and culture.
  • Understand how literary techniques and devices offer further dimensions to the literal level of a text.
  • Express their understanding and interpretation of texts in discussion and in proficiently written essays.
  • Demonstrate their ability to write a documented paper using library sources.

2.Guidelines for Implementation of 111 Objectives:

  • Students will study a sufficient number of challenging works by major authors from several time periods and cultures to broaden their knowledge of literary art and to increase their awareness of perspectives from other cultures and times.
  • Students will be expected to discuss, comment on, and question literary texts assigned.
  • Students will show their mastery of texts and writing proficiency by composing essays and writing examinations on the texts. They will write a minimum of 2500 words.
  • All teachers of Honors English must meet classes, at the stipulated time and for the allotted time period. These guidelines may be considered in personnel decisions; major deviations from the guidelines must be cleared with the department chair.

English 112 Honors English



Revised (12/01)


1.Objectives: Honors English focuses on the classics of world literature. English 112 studies works from the eighteenth century to the present and builds on the reading and writing skills developed in English 111. As a result of studying world literature, students in Honors English should demonstrate their ability to:

  • Comprehend the literal level of literary texts.
  • Interpret literary texts from various cultures and time periods; for example, students should be able to draw, support, and develop inferences based on literary texts.
  • Appreciate the variety of world literature and understand how literature is related to history and culture
  • Understand how literary techniques and devices offer further dimensions to the literal level of a text.
  • Express their understanding and interpretation of texts in discussion and in proficiently written essays.
  • Show an increased sophistication over English 111 in writing skills, strategies for essay development, reading comprehension, and insight into literary texts.

2.Guidelines for Implementing Honors English 112 Objectives:

  • Students will study a sufficient number of challenging works by major authors from several time periods and cultures to broaden their knowledge of literary art and to increase their awareness of perspectives from other cultures and times.
  • Students will be expected to discuss, comment on, and question literary texts assigned.
  • Students will show their mastery of texts and writing proficiency by composing essays and writing examinations on the texts. They will write a minimum of 2500 words.
  • In response to their essays, students will receive written or oral comments from their instructors.
  • The course grade will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the students' written work, supplemented by such tests, quizzes, and oral presentations as appropriate for the course. Assigned grades will be consistent with grading policies stated and explained at the beginning of the term.
  • All teachers of Honors English must meet classes, at the stipulated time and for the allotted time period. These guidelines may be considered in personnel decisions; major deviations from the guidelines must be cleared with the department chair.