Error in custom script module

GE Category Definitions

The General Education Program provides the core of what it means to be a well educated university graduate. The goal is to promote human excellence through a broad foundation of skills and knowledge required to realize a meaningful personal, professional, and civic life. The General Education Program is intended to enable students to contribute to and live responsibly in a diverse, interconnected, and technologically sophisticated global community. (GEC 2006)

GE Category Definitions

November 23, 1998
Revised: September 2002

General Skills and Abilities  

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Definition: Communication Skills are the study and application of expressive and receptive language skills, most often exercised in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. These fundamental skills are basic to human development and academic functioning.

Criteria: To satisfy GE requirements for Communication Skills, courses must be general in nature. A course must include at least one of the following as the primary instructional purpose: 

  1. The study and application of reading and writing skills in a designated language.  
  2. Delivery of general addresses to an audience in a designated language.  
  3. The study and acquisition of general receptive language skills in a designated language.        


ANALYTIC REASONING SKILLS


Definition: Analytic reasoning is the formulation and critique of deductive and inductive arguments, both quantitative and non-quantitative. This reasoning is essential to many intellectual activities, such as critical thinking, problem-solving, creating and applying. This component requires students to engage in general learning experiences in mathematics, logic, statistics, or computer science.

Criteria: A course used to satisfy GE distribution requirements for Analytic Reasoning Skills must include the following as the primary instructional purpose: 

  1. The study and application of processes of inductive or deductive reasoning.  
  2. The study and application of quantitative or formula-based reasoning.


HEALTH ENHANCEMENT AND PHYSICAL WELL-BEING

Health Enhancement

Definition: Health enhancement is the study of physical and mental well-being.

Criteria: The primary intent of courses used to satisfy GE distribution requirements for Health Enhancement must include the following:

  1. The relationship of health to the development of the whole person.
  2. The study of nutrition, health, and personal development as it pertains to wellness.
  3. The relationship between life style and health.


Physical Activities

Definition: Physical activities are movement-related activities leading to wellness.

Criteria:The primary intent of courses used to satisfy the GE distribution requirements for Physical Activities must include one of the following:

  1. Participation in a group physical activity.
  2. Participation in an individual physical activity.
  3. Participation in a physical activity for life-long health benefits.
  4. Participate in a competitive sport.

General Knowledge, Appreciation and Values

NATURAL SCIENCES

Definition:The Natural Sciences are the sciences of the physical world, its phenomena, and the laws governing these phenomena. The branches of Natural Sciences--such as astronomy, geosciences, biological sciences, chemistry, physics--deal primarily with matter, energy, and their interrelations and transformations; with living organisms and vital processes; with the laws and phenomena relating to organisms, plants and animal life; with the physical processes and phenomena of particular systems; and with the physical properties and composition of nature and its products.

Criteria: Courses used to satisfy the GE distribution requirements for Natural Sciences must include, as primary instructional intent, all of the following:

  • Introduction to major concepts of a natural science discipline, providing insights into its breadth and its relationship to other disciplines.
  • Illustration of relationships between experiments, models, theories and laws.
  • Illustration of the generation and testing of data and the application of concepts and knowledge to the solution of problems.
  • Discussion of the limitations of data and the possibility of alternative interpretations.

At least one of the two required courses must include laboratory or field experience.

 

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Social Sciences

Definition:The social sciences formulate and verify general hypotheses regarding human behavior. The social sciences deal with the behavior of societal, economic, political and cultural groups. Consequently this component focuses on the academic disciplines of sociology, economics, political science and cultural anthropology, insofar as these disciplines deal with general and non-applied knowledge concerning social behavior.

Criteria:To satisfy the GE distribution requirements for Social Sciences, a course must include one or more of the following as the primary instructional purpose:

  1. Intrapersonal, and/or sociocultural factors associated with collective action or societal development.
  2. Human collectivities, organizations, institutions, and cultures, their infrastructures and interrelationships.
  3. Methodologies for conducting inquiry into collective action, societies or cultures.
  4. Alternative theoretical frameworks which have been used to offer meaningful explanations of social phenomena.


Behavioral Sciences

Definition: The behavioral sciences include general knowledge about the psychological behavior of human beings, insofar as this knowledge concerns the human being's relationships to the self and to other individuals. Criteria focus on the general and non-applied learning experiences in the academic field of psychology.

Criteria: To satisfy the GE distribution requirements for Behavioral Sciences, a course must include one of the following as the primary instructional purpose:

  • Intrapersonal, interpersonal and/or sociocultural factors associated with human behavior.
  • Methodologies for conducting inquiry into human behavior.
  • Alternative theoretical frameworks which have been used to offer meaningful explanations of human behavior.


HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS

Humanities

Definition: The Humanities investigate human constructs and values, as opposed to those studies that investigate natural and physical processes and those that are concerned with the development of basic or professional skills.

The humanistic disciplines--such as art history, history, music appreciation, literature, and philosophy--are concerned with questions, issues and concepts basic to the formation of character and the establishment of values in a human context; they induce an organic study of letters and knowledge; they provide literary, aesthetic and intellectual experiences which enrich and enlighten human life.

Criteria: Courses used to satisfy GE distribution requirements for the Humanities must employ (a) and one other of the following as the primary instructional purposes:

  • Humanistic means of inquiry, such as the critical use of sources and evaluation of evidence, the exercise of judgment an expression of ideas, the organization, logical analysis, and creative use of substantial bodies of knowledge.
  • Development of capacities for making informed and independent evaluation of the nature of knowledge, language, and representation, and concerning the formation of ethical or aesthetic concepts, or the ways in which values are manifested within diverse theoretical or conceptual frameworks.
  • Introduction to substantial and coherent bodies of historical, cultural, literary or philosophical knowledge, as a means of increasing understanding of the complexities and varieties of human events.
  • Enhancement and extension of responses to literature and/or other arts by introducing the process of thoughtful and systematic analysis, or by fostering an appreciation of distinctive cultures and traditions, or by increasing sensitivity to language and its nuances.
  • Application of humanistic perspectives to other branches of knowledge or to issues of universal human concern.


Arts

Definition: Arts employ conscious use of skill and creative imagination in the production of artistic objects or performances which stress values that stand outside conventional ideas of utility.

Criteria: Courses used to satisfy the GE distribution requirements for the Arts must include either of the following as the primary instructional purpose:

  • The creation of a visual, musical, or literary art work.
  • Practice in a specific art medium.


TECHNOLOGY


Definition: Technology is the knowledge, volition, and process of utilizing tools, resources, and systems resulting in control over the natural and artificial environment altering the human condition.

Criteria: Courses used to satisfy the GE distribution requirements for Technology must include all of the following as primary instructional purpose:
Introduction to major concepts of technology as a discipline, providing insights into its breadth and into its relationship to other disciplines.
Research information regarding materials, energy, information, people and tools as they apply to technological systems designed to meet human needs and wants.
Implications and alternative interpretations of technological changes to determine impacts on individuals, society and the future.


INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES


Definition: Interdisciplinary Studies courses bridge some of the criteria for two or more of the traditional General Education categories. Interdisciplinary Studies courses explore subject matter that overlaps such categories as Humanities and Natural Science or Social Science and Technology, fostering transference of knowledge between disciplines, applying methods of one discipline to one or more others, encouraging critical thinking that involves the impact of one discipline on others, and stimulating creative synthesis.

Criteria: Courses categorized as Interdisciplinary Studies must meet all of the following criteria. The primary instructional purposes will:

  • Have basis on at least one criterion each from two or more of the following GE categories: Communication Skills, Analytic Reasoning, Humanities and the Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Natural Sciences.
  • Involve the synthesis of material from at least two of the other General Education categories.
  • Focus on general and non-applied learning.